'Yo my man! What's the word?' 'I can't call it.'

"I believe, help my unbelief!" - Mark 9:24

"Although logos is common to all, most people live
as if they had a wisdom of their own."
1. p.77. Fr.2, cited in T. S. Elliot's Four Quartets

"For in the final analysis, our most basic link is that we all inhabit this small planet. We all breathe the same air. We all cherish our children's future. And we are all mortal." – Robert F. Kennedy

“He has told you, O man, what is good;
and what does the LORD require of you
but to do justice, and to love kindness,
and to walk humbly with your God?”
— Micah 6:8

Archive

Flavors.me: homepage/portal
~ Sunday, September 14 ~
Permalink
(Image Source) Just finished watching Losing Isaiah.  
I thought Isaiah 11:6 was a fitting end: “The wolf will live with the lamb, the leopard will lie down with the goat, the calf and the lion and the yearling together; and a little child will lead them.”
High level plot summary (I’m not spoiling it):
a poor, black drug addict leaves her baby on a trash heap while high.  
After being in the elements overnight, trashmen find the child after almost throwing him away.  
White, middle class social worker Margaret (Jessica Lange) sees the infant being resuscitated and feels a connection to the child only mothers know.
Isaiah is three or four now, and is found in an affluent family that loves him.  However, there’s some sort of dissonance in his frequent outbursts and as his adopted sister points out (though he doesn’t understand) that he looks different than them.  He is black.
Khaila finds out that the baby she abandoned is actually alive and seeks to win him back, if she can get clean.
Powerful movie that touches on so many conundrums of race, nurture, and community.  In my opinion, one of the best scenes in this movie is when Samuel L. Jackson, playing the black lawyer advocating for Khaila to reclaim custody of Isaiah, and Margaret, find themselves standing outside of the courthouse together in the rain under an awning, smoking.  
Jackson offers his lighter.  ”Thank you.”  ”You’re welcome.”  So much is left unsaid.  They could almost be on the same side.  Margaret loves Isaiah, it’s unquestionable.  But the lawyer notes they haven’t read him black children’s books, etc.  Will Isaiah truly know himself?
Side note: Many of the reviews I saw online of this movie questioned how anyone could not side with the loving, white mother.  Love is all that matters.  Love IS all that matters, but I’d argue that by not exposing the child to black culture, even at his young age, was to deny him the full measure of love.
But having a black mother is no guarantee to being exposed to black literature and culture, especially if she’s strung out on a high.
Teaching and learning black history is not about revisionism and exclusion of ‘white’ or general history.  It’s about communal and personal identity making.  It doesn’t matter if in aggregate, black contributions are proportionate (say 13%) or less to the american population of African descent (and are thus covered less in the history books.)  If I never read about black accomplishments and successful civilization, maybe I’d start to believe the bell-curve comments of YouTube.  Plus, once I got to college I realized my high school history courses definitely, though not wholly, lacked in black facts and ideas.

Who is Isaiah’s mom?  Khaila Richards (Halle Berry) or Margaret Lewin (Jessica Lange)?

(Image Source) Just finished watching Losing Isaiah.  

I thought Isaiah 11:6 was a fitting end: “The wolf will live with the lamb, the leopard will lie down with the goat, the calf and the lion and the yearling together; and a little child will lead them.”

High level plot summary (I’m not spoiling it):

  • a poor, black drug addict leaves her baby on a trash heap while high.  
  • After being in the elements overnight, trashmen find the child after almost throwing him away.  
  • White, middle class social worker Margaret (Jessica Lange) sees the infant being resuscitated and feels a connection to the child only mothers know.
  • Isaiah is three or four now, and is found in an affluent family that loves him.  However, there’s some sort of dissonance in his frequent outbursts and as his adopted sister points out (though he doesn’t understand) that he looks different than them.  He is black.
  • Khaila finds out that the baby she abandoned is actually alive and seeks to win him back, if she can get clean.

Powerful movie that touches on so many conundrums of race, nurture, and community.  In my opinion, one of the best scenes in this movie is when Samuel L. Jackson, playing the black lawyer advocating for Khaila to reclaim custody of Isaiah, and Margaret, find themselves standing outside of the courthouse together in the rain under an awning, smoking.  

Jackson offers his lighter.  ”Thank you.”  ”You’re welcome.”  So much is left unsaid.  They could almost be on the same side.  Margaret loves Isaiah, it’s unquestionable.  But the lawyer notes they haven’t read him black children’s books, etc.  Will Isaiah truly know himself?

Side note: Many of the reviews I saw online of this movie questioned how anyone could not side with the loving, white mother.  Love is all that matters.  Love IS all that matters, but I’d argue that by not exposing the child to black culture, even at his young age, was to deny him the full measure of love.

But having a black mother is no guarantee to being exposed to black literature and culture, especially if she’s strung out on a high.

Teaching and learning black history is not about revisionism and exclusion of ‘white’ or general history.  It’s about communal and personal identity making.  It doesn’t matter if in aggregate, black contributions are proportionate (say 13%) or less to the american population of African descent (and are thus covered less in the history books.)  If I never read about black accomplishments and successful civilization, maybe I’d start to believe the bell-curve comments of YouTube.  Plus, once I got to college I realized my high school history courses definitely, though not wholly, lacked in black facts and ideas.

Who is Isaiah’s mom?  Khaila Richards (Halle Berry) or Margaret Lewin (Jessica Lange)?

Tags: Losing Isaiah Halle Berry Jessica Lange Samuel L Jackson Race Race Relations America United States Chicago Adoption
~ Thursday, September 11 ~
Permalink
HILARIOUS
'MRW president Obama says “When you threaten America, you will find no safe haven.”'
As seen on reddit: http://www.reddit.com/r/reactiongifs/comments/2g3hrk/mrw_president_obama_says_when_you_threaten/

The above taken from this video, also hilarious: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ChppfnazzE

HILARIOUS

'MRW president Obama says “When you threaten America, you will find no safe haven.”'

As seen on reddit: http://www.reddit.com/r/reactiongifs/comments/2g3hrk/mrw_president_obama_says_when_you_threaten/

The above taken from this video, also hilarious: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ChppfnazzE

Tags: reddit funny obama ISIL ISIS SupHotFiya Rap Battle Supa Hot Fiya
2 notes
~ Wednesday, September 10 ~
Permalink Tags: NFL Roger Goodell Ray Rice Greg Hardy
1 note
~ Tuesday, September 9 ~
Permalink
When you think you are done you’re only 40% of what your body is capable of doing. That’s just the limit that we put on ourselves.

Permalink

Ray Rice

Come on man.

Wife beating + racism = ‘tradition’.

Tags: NFL Roger Goodell Redskins
Permalink
Excellence.  (Source)

Excellence.  (Source)

Tags: Ruby Dee Ossie Davis
~ Saturday, September 6 ~
Permalink

(Source: Spotify)

Tags: Music Josh Garrels
Permalink
Farther along we’ll know all about it
Farther along we’ll understand why
Cheer up my brothers, live in the sunshine
We’ll understand this, all by and by

Farther Along (2011) - Josh Garrels

Listen & Lyrics: http://joshgarrels.bandcamp.com/track/farther-along

I heard this for the first time last weekend.  My good friend Arthur walked out of the wedding chapel with his bride, Kelli, to this song. 

This song was originally written in 1911 by an itinerant preacher.  The story is grabbing: “…Fletcher was feeling depressed because his wife… was expecting their first-born child in a few weeks and he wouldn’t be present for the occasion. He felt that his priorities were with his ministry in the Indian Territories and wrote the lyrics to reflect his frame of mind at the time…” [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Farther_Along_(song)]

Tags: Josh Garrels Meaning Vision Music apilgrimsprogress
~ Tuesday, September 2 ~
Permalink
~ Monday, September 1 ~
Permalink
From: http://fly.historicwings.com/2012/06/d-day-and-operation-neptune/
D-Day was 70 years ago, this past June.
I watched The Longest Day (1962) a few weeks ago.  Great war movie.  ”I wonder which side God is on…” ask both the British and the Germans.
The last lines, paraphrased, a Brit speaking to an American - “He’s dead, I’m wounded, and you’re lost.”  

From: http://fly.historicwings.com/2012/06/d-day-and-operation-neptune/

D-Day was 70 years ago, this past June.

I watched The Longest Day (1962) a few weeks ago.  Great war movie.  ”I wonder which side God is on…” ask both the British and the Germans.

The last lines, paraphrased, a Brit speaking to an American - “He’s dead, I’m wounded, and you’re lost.”  

Tags: WWII D-Day
Permalink Tags: Bibliotheca
Permalink
Per previous post.  My wife took this on 2014-04-13.

Per previous post.  My wife took this on 2014-04-13.

Tags: Djembe Meridian Hill Park D.C. Me
1 note
Permalink Tags: Meridian Hill Drum Circle Washington D.C. DC Rhythym Djembe
~ Sunday, August 31 ~
Permalink

Internet Archive.  As first seen on Aeon.

Tags: Documentary Documentary Short Internet Information Internet Archive Digital Library Library Aeon
Permalink